In honor of the 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment the Moose Lake Star-Gazette will be reaching out to “Leading Ladies” in our community to find out what voting means to them. Each week until the October 29, 2020 edition of the Star-Gazette we will feature a submission. Writers are asked to keep their response to approximately 250 words, avoid party and candidate endorsements and focus instead on what the right to vote means to them. 

This week we asked Lauri Ketola, Carlton County Attorney.

What does the right to vote mean to you? 

Every human being, regardless of gender, is created in the image of God endowed with gifts and talents to be used in service to God and humanity. “That all men and women are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” (Declaration of Independence) The right of women to vote in the United States, acknowledges and honors this truth by allowing women to have a voice in choosing who will serve them and their community.  I am grateful that women over 100 years ago fought for women to be afforded all the rights and responsibilities of citizenship of the United States, including the right to vote. Prior to the 19th Amendment, not only did women lack the ability to vote, but also the ability to serve. Over the past 100 years we have seen women serve in various capacities from the highest Court in the land to attorney generals, state senators, and local school boards. Drawing on their unique gifts and talents to make historical decisions within these various offices, women have helped shape the landscape of this country.  As a woman elected in Carlton County, I am honored and privileged to work alongside very talented people as we serve the citizens of this county.  I am grateful for the women who paved the way for me.

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